Everything Jews touch turns to poison

Thanks to the efforts of many anti-Zionists over the last decade, today there is more awareness of the extent to which the original Christianity and Mohammedanism have been Judaized following the deaths of their founders. But a lot of people who today spend all their time trashing Christianity and Mohammedanism based on this knowledge will, in the same breath, talk about Indian religion as though it was some kind of Jew-free haven. (I am using the term “Jew” loosely here; they are strictly speaking pre-Judaic Turanians.) If only……

Just as we discourage the term “Abrahamic religions” because it mixes Judaism with the (originally) Gnostic theisms, we similarly discourage the term “Dharmic religions” because it mixes Brahmanism with Sramanism. Instead, the Gnostic theisms and the Sramanist systems need to start thinking of each other as being the same camp. Namdhari Sikhs might fit into this camp also; they seem to be the only Sikhs (that I know of so far) who have figured out that Sikhism started out as an attempt to revive the old way of life (sounds familiar by now?):

http://namdharitrust.org/

This time let’s take a trip to the Indus Valley to see what happened all those thousands of years ago:

http://aryanism.net/culture/aryan-race/aryan-diffusion-part-3/

I have been unable to find suitable skull comparison photos for this page. I already asked JJ about this in private and he didn’t have any in his massive collection either (did you manage to find any since we last spoke???). If anyone out there has pictures of pre-Neolithic and post-Neolithic skulls from India suitable for the page, please share them. Remember, I am not interested in the pointless ANI vs ASI comparisons that HBD foppery forums have already done to death; that stuff occurred tens of thousands of years before the period relevant to us; ANI and ASI are both Gentile gene pools:

Aryans did not arrive until less then 10000 years ago, and Turanians even later than that.

This is also a call for Indosphere Aryanists to join our movement! There are many problems in that part of the world that need deep ideological solutions. Contact us:

http://aryanism.net/about/contact/

This entry was posted in Aryan Sanctuary. Bookmark the permalink.

41 Responses to Everything Jews touch turns to poison

  1. Phoenix says:

    This is simply Awesome. Fantastic job on Part 3!!! It actually is very relevant to a discussion I’m in the middle of having and helps a lot with the wheres and whys and why the Vedic people were problematic to my ( rudimentary and mostly reliant on intuition) understanding of ancient Aryan culture. Fascinating…
    Especially after reading this, it is agonizing to think of and to witness day to day the insatiable bloodlust of the Jew creeping into every crevice it can find, and only deepens the determination to stamp it out. Very good words to part with as well – if there is a Will, there is a way to end the slaughter. United we can succeed in doing so!

  2. Decebal says:

    Very well done! Hinduism as a whole seems to be of two minds – one Aryan, and one Gentile. This has to do with the mixing up of different ideas in history, as stated in the article. One good example is Shiva, who is connected with asceticism and yoga on one hand, and sexuality on the other. (Scroll down to the part on the phallus worship: http://hinduism.about.com/od/lordshiva/p/shivastories.htm)

    Not completely unconnected, the main gods in Germanic culture are the Æsir, also a cognate of Asura. The lesser gods are the Vanir, assimilated pre-Germanic gods. The two groups are similar to the ones of India in that the former are connected with morality and society (and agriculture), while the latter are nature gods.

  3. Torch says:

    I have come across a few problems with this article.

    The first is the entire narrative, which is different from the other sections dealing with Aryan Diffusion. In this section, there is no Aryan Diffusion. In fact, the narrative suggests that the Aryans were native to India and the Vedics came into India (Thus accepting the Aryan Invasion Theory, but giving the title ‘Aryan’ to another identity) and, ironically, the ones resisting the Vedics speaking Sanskrit, were the Aryans.

    Is there any proof that Sura is a fabricated synonym of Deva? There have been many temples built for the sun god Surya, which means “Supreme Light.”

    The external link which links Brahma to Abraham, and Saraswati to Sarah has some inaccuracies. Brahma is merely the demiurge-like god of creation. It is untrue that worship of Brahma is the third-largest sect. He is in the Trimurti (Brahma – Creation. Vishnu – Preservation. Shiva – Destruction) The three largest sects in Hinduism are 1) Shaivism 2) Vaishnavism 3) Shakti. Brahma has had little significance in worship. Using a source which uses Brahma and Brahman interchangeably also discredits the link given.
    Saraswati, who is regarded as goddess of knowledge, had a central role in Vedic culture because of the importance of cleanliness. The Saraswati river was regarded as a river flowing with knowledge. In Aryan cultures, taking a bath and cleaning oneself was a ritual because of the potency that water was recognized to have. Saraswati is also worshiped by Jains. (http://www.digambarjainonline.com/dharma/sarswti.htm)
    The only similarity is seemingly in the spelling and pronunciation of some of the names with Hebrew ones. The theology and mythology, however, is different and completely unrelated.

    The oldest versions of Ramayana and Mahabharata predate the Vedic versions? Is this a claim by a person or a handful of people; is there evidence of this?

    Does the poster agree with Alfred Rosenberg’s narrative on Aryan influences in India? He seemed to have radically different positions:
    “Instinctively, as it were, the Indoaryans separated themselves from the dark alien peoples they encountered. The institution of caste was
    the outcome of this instinctive aversion. Varna means caste, but it also means colour. The fair Aryans thus linked themselves to an
    acceptable image of the human type, and created a gulf between themselves as conquerors and the black brown natives of pre Aryan
    India. According to this opposition of blood and blood, the Aryans evolved a worldview which, for depth and range, cannot be surpassed
    by any philosophy even today, although admittedly this was only after a long battle against the constantly intruding ideas of the racially
    inferior aborigines.”

    Paragraph right after quote you use from ‘Mythus’:
    “Soon the rich, blood based meaning of Varna was entirely lost. Today it is only a division between technical, professional, and other
    classes, and has degenerated into the vilest travesty of the wisest idea in world history. The later Indian did not comprehend the threefold
    significance of blood, self, and universe. He saw only the last two. And he perished in the attempt at isolated contemplation of the self in
    racial pollution, whose modern products are wretched mongrels, seeking healing for their crippled existence in the waters of the Ganges.”

    What is the comparison between the Jain and Vedic pratiks for? Is it trying to prove that this symbol (one symbol among many others containing swastikas) indicates the swastika in Vedic religion is not central? The hexagram in Hinduism alone represents downward and upward energies, with the image in the center being the focus or the goal of the practitioner(s).

    The so-called “Pre-Vedic concept of karma” is virtually the same as the Vedic. In both narratives the final agreement is that actions which have ethical consequences are reconcilable, during which struggle through many lives permeates.
    Overt caste discrimination and cruelness is never found in any doctrine. It is widely accepted that the Varnas degenerated into superstition. It would do the article justice if the poster included how the priesthood of the Jains deferred from that of the Vedics.

    In practice, the Kshatriyas were always more powerful than the Brahmanas, with the Rajas (Kings) going to Brahmanas for consultation.

    More on Varna (Caste): the origin of the Varnas is mentioned in the Purusha Suktam of the Rig Veda. It outlines the panentheistic nature of the Purusha, or Cosmic Man. (Already it is not contingent with Gnostic beliefs that materiality is separate from and has no interaction with supreme divinities. Even though in Hinduism there has been a distinction between Devas (demi-gods subject to changes) and concepts of Ishvara, Narayana, etc.) The suggestion is that equality of materially manifested beings is non-inherent and there are inherent differences of inclinations and functions. Thus comes concept of Varna. Racial theorists such as Rosenberg himself said that the Varnas were strictly implemented as castes where one is born into when the Aryans interacted with non-Aryans. With the fading of Aryan blood memory, so did fade the original meaning of Varna.

    Where is there evidence that milk was not cultivated by the Indus Valley people? A book on the civilization (http://books.google.com/books?id=1AJO2A-CbccC&pg=PA124&lpg=PA124&dq=indus+valley+milk&source=bl&ots=jaoQDvqkO6&sig=yiEWntZLSEqfKpamE5mjbMJVnSU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=b0tMUuHCJuzUyQHyq4HQDw&ved=0CEUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=indus%20valley%20milk&f=false) says there is no indication either way. It also indicates that meat
    This may be a permeating discussion here: it seems that domesticating animals to help plough fields is no more ethical than taking an animal’s milk during lactation. The section mentioned both are forms of cattle worship, which implies that the cattle are nevertheless treated with concern. Domestication of cattle for labor during the the Neolithic age came with milking the same cattle. Neither is ignoble.

    The Rig Veda also includes Rishabha (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rishabha_(Hinduism)#Relation_to_Jainism)

  4. Torch says:

    @ Decebal

    Here is a meaningful explanation by an expert dismissing the focus on a supposed phallic appearance of the Shiva linga: http://www.vedanet.com/2012/06/the-shiva-linga-and-its-meaning/

  5. AS says:

    @Phoenix

    Years ago, someone called Quest tried to sell me the idea that the Vedics were the good guys. Quest was later exposed as a Jew. This is part of a broader Zionist pattern of substituting Turanians for Aryans wherever possible, thereby associating the name “Aryan” with Turanian traits. This is exactly the same trick as substituting Yahweh in place of Jesus’ God. They do this to every potentially anti-Zionist concept that crosses their path. The worst part of it is that such tricks need not fool everyone in order to be effective; merely fooling a fraction of the people involved suffices to create a huge amount of confusion.

    @Decebal

    The Aesir will be covered in Part 6. (And yes, the Vanir were Turanians.)

    @Torch (a.k.a. Jason)

    “The first is the entire narrative, which is different from the other sections dealing with Aryan Diffusion. In this section, there is no Aryan Diffusion. In fact, the narrative suggests that the Aryans were native to India”

    That is untrue. The narrative explicitly cites the sudden appearance of cereals on Indian soil as the material evidence for Aryan arrival. It proposes that the Suryavansha migration comes from the Helmand basin. The only natives of India were the “primitive men” whom the Suryavansha encountered and taught, and eventually mixed with.

    “and the Vedics came into India”

    No, both the Suryavansha and the Vedics came to India, at different stages in time, which is why the page includes this map:

    http://aryanism.net/wp-content/uploads/Indus-Map.gif

    “Is there any proof that Sura is a fabricated synonym of Deva?”

    “Sura” is indeed used with the same semantic meaning as “Deva” in Vedic mythology, yet whereas “Deva” is cognate with the Iranian “Daeva”, “Sura” has no cognate term “Hura” in Iranian. This suggests that “Sura” was brought into use only after the Vedics arrived in India, and they did this even though a perfectly adequate word (“Deva”) for the same concept already exists.

    “The external link which links Brahma to Abraham, and Saraswati to Sarah has some inaccuracies.”

    We don’t necessarily agree with everything in the external link. We only agree with the main proposition that the Vedics and the Israelites have common ancestry, which we conjecture to be a Turanian ancestry.

    “Saraswati is also worshiped by Jains.”

    You don’t think Jainism might have incorporated Brahmanist ideas as a consequence of all the time they spent alongside each other? (This, if anything, supports the proposition that Jainism fails to be a revolutionary religion, as Siddhartha realized.)

    “The only similarity is seemingly in the spelling and pronunciation of some of the names with Hebrew ones. The theology and mythology, however, is different and completely unrelated.”

    Yes, because Krishna and Moses were operating in different parts of the world.

    “The oldest versions of Ramayana and Mahabharata predate the Vedic versions? Is this a claim by a person or a handful of people; is there evidence of this?”

    There is evidence both ways, but as a propaganda site we have to choose a narrative! If you are advising that the page would look better by not making such a claim, I could remove that phrase.

    “Does the poster agree with Alfred Rosenberg’s narrative on Aryan influences in India?”

    In general, no. Rosenberg wrote his book in the 1920s, just as the earliest digs that uncovered Indus Valley civilization were being made. The prevailing model of Indian demography at the time involved only one migration event (Bronze Age), not two (Neolithic, Bronze Age). Thus Rosenberg had only two choices for Aryan influence in India: the Vedics (Bronze Age) or the Indian aboriginals (Paleolithic). It would have made no sense to choose the aboriginals because they never migrated elsewhere (whereas the Aryan narrative demands wide migration), so he had no option but to go with the Vedics. But if he had been given the additional choice that we have today, I feel confident that he would have presented a narrative much closer to ours. (It should also be noted that Hitler explicitly stated that Mythus was not an official work; I suspect he knew that a later treatment that took into account emerging archaeology would be more satisfactory.)

    “Paragraph right after quote you use from ‘Mythus’:
    “Soon the rich, blood based meaning of Varna was entirely lost. Today it is only a division between technical, professional, and other
    classes, and has degenerated into the vilest travesty of the wisest idea in world history. The later Indian did not comprehend the threefold
    significance of blood, self, and universe. He saw only the last two. And he perished in the attempt at isolated contemplation of the self in
    racial pollution, whose modern products are wretched mongrels, seeking healing for their crippled existence in the waters of the Ganges.””

    I agree that Rishabha’s clan had their blood polluted by mixing with the Gentiles. I disagree that Rishabha made any attempt to prevent this (it would have been out-of-character for him to do so). The Vedics were the ones who made the attempt to prevent this (but failed anyway).

    “What is the comparison between the Jain and Vedic pratiks for? Is it trying to prove that this symbol (one symbol among many others containing swastikas) indicates the swastika in Vedic religion is not central?”

    I thought the swastika inside the hexagram was an apt visual representation of Turanian usurpation of the Aryan name.

    “The hexagram in Hinduism alone represents downward and upward energies”

    I consider this a Turanian concept, ultimately originating in the Sky-Father, Earth-Mother cults in Central Asia (which is where the Vedics came from). In India it became much more sophisticated to suit local tastes, but back in Central Asia (which was much less scholarly than India) it retained its raw form:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tengri

    “Where is there evidence that milk was not cultivated by the Indus Valley people?”

    Such evidence is archaeologically impossible. I personally believe that milk probably WAS consumed by the Indus Valley people, although I would strongly suspect the aboriginals started it. I stress that Indus Valley civilization is NOT to be taken as an ideal society; it is a society of an Aryan minority ruling over a Gentile majority, with the Aryan minority eventually mixing racially with the Gentile majority, similar to the Yangtze Valley Yue cities in China.

    “it seems that domesticating animals to help plough fields is no more ethical than taking an animal’s milk during lactation.”

    In order to make an animal lactate it is necessary to impregnate her. In order to make the milk available for human collection, the child has to be aborted during gestation, killed after birth or simply denied access to the milk intended for the child. Those who treated animal females and children in this way did not treat their own females and children in this way for the same purpose, thus evincing a double-standard. In comparison, those who got animals to plough fields also did ploughing themselves, so they are not getting animals to do what they are not willing to do themselves, so there is no double-standard. (Of course for the future I advocate solar-powered automata to do ploughing rather than cows.)

    “The Rig Veda also includes Rishabha”

    It must, because its political aim was to present the Vedics as rightful rulers continuing from the the previous rulers. But there is no dispute that Rishabha is a less important character in Vedic mythology than in Jain mythology. In the same way, the Huaxia legends also mention Shennong – they couldn’t get away with not doing so – but diminished his importance. The point is that EVERY mythical narrative is politically motivated. Including ours. The only difference is that we are willing to admit it, whereas the Vedics and the Huaxia try to claim that theirs were ‘factual’!

  6. Decebal says:

    @Torch, I’ve read quite a few interpretations of the symbol. Some claim it has to do with nirvana (Aryan), some with creative forces (related to the hexagram, in a sense; Turanic) and some reduce it to a mere phallic symbol (Gentile, or herders with a plan).

    @AS, I meant to reinforce a point. I’ll leave the discussion for part six.

  7. mandrake says:

    Nirvana or Nibb?na is an interesting concept. Like the word Karma / Kamma which is thrown around in the West in casual terms. Their real meaning is sometimes lost.
    Perhaps in the future we can elaborate on the Sanskrit to give others a real insight into what the concepts actually are without the pop-culture crass meanings attributed to them.

  8. Decebal says:

    @mandrake, what is the meaning attributed to the concept of Nirvana in the West? I haven’t heard it used in popular culture (minus the one rock band).

  9. John Johnson says:

    No, I have not been able to find any skull-comparison images yet. I will share them if I do.

    Also, the diffusion series is great, keep up the fine work!

  10. AS says:

    @Decebal

    “I meant to reinforce a point.”

    I understand. Thanks!

    @JJ

    Thanks. In the meantime we might as well post some celebrity pictures!

    Turanian-leaning:

    http://www.hdwpapers.com/walls/aishwarya_rai_wallpaper_6-normal5.4.jpg

    Aryan-leaning:

    http://www.rocketsing.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Neha-Dhupia.jpg

  11. Anthony says:

    @AS, I notice you say ‘Turanian-leaning’ rather than ‘Jewish-leaning’. Does this mean there are extant non-Jewish Turanians? Will you clarify this in the Aryan Diffusion series?

  12. AS says:

    “I notice you say ‘Turanian-leaning’ rather than ‘Jewish-leaning’.”

    It would be incorrect to assume that this kind of facial shape is sufficient to imply Jewish ancestry, so I don’t say “Jewish-leaning”. I would only say “Jewish-leaning” if I already knew for certain that there was Jewish blood somewhere in the gene pool from which the example was taken, which in the case of Rai (or Kwan in the Part 2 thread) I honestly don’t.

    “Does this mean there are extant non-Jewish Turanians?”

    In the same way that there are extant Aryans, sure. But if you mean unmixed bloodlines, I have no idea. Even if we go to the people who still live as nomadic herders on the Turanian steppe, they will probably be mixed due to the Turanian habit of kidnapping non-Turanian females during their raids.

    “Will you clarify this in the Aryan Diffusion series?”

    You can already see Part 4, so let me know if it is clear enough there.

  13. Anthony says:

    What I want to know is are Turanians Gentiles or something completely separate?

  14. AS says:

    In the old days they were herders, whereas Gentiles were hunters, so back then they were not Gentiles in the evolutionary sense. Today, non-Jews with Turanian blood memory might be members of Gentile ethnotribes, but they will probably be the more cunning members. Turanism also exists as an explicit ideology which in theory should appeal to those with Turanian blood memory:

    http://www.budapesttimes.hu/2012/02/05/turanism-the-new-ideology-of-the-far-right/

    To me, Dugin’s Eurasianism is thinly-veiled Turanism.

  15. Anthony says:

    I see your difficulty in classifying them. On the one hand, you want to classify them as Gentiles because they self-identify with Gentile tribes. On the other hand, they have the mind and behaviour of Turanians (which is the same as the Jewish mind and behaviour.) Is that right? This is not just a problem with non-Jewish Turanians. There are some Jews like this too. Take this guy, for instance:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Zhirinovsky
    Quote: “Why should I reject Russian blood, Russian culture, Russian land, and fall in love with the Jewish people only because of that single drop of blood that my father left in my mother’s body?”
    How would you classify him?

  16. AS says:

    I wouldn’t call it a difficulty. For practical purposes, if I believe someone is sincerely self-identifying with a Gentile tribe (as opposed to claiming to do so with the aim of infiltration), then they are of that tribe whatever their genetics.

    Even among Gentiles some probably evolved to be more cunning than others (e.g. land hunting would probably select for cunning more strongly than fishing), so it’s not like we can’t accommodate some extent of cunning in the Gentile camp.

    “How would you classify him?”

    Either his quote is truthful, and therefore he is a Gentile who happens to have some Jewish ancestry, or his quote is untruthful, and therefore he is a Jew who has openly infiltrated a Gentile organization for Zionist ends. Either way, he is non-Aryan. At the end of the day, Aryan or non-Aryan is the most important practical distinction from our perspective. Let the Gentiles worry about whether they can trust him or not! I have added him to the BS List as a Jew for now.

  17. Victor says:

    Great work! This series has helped me understand a lot of things.

    A general question concerning language: did the Indo-European languages originate from Turanians? It is often claimed that Aryans spread the Indo-European languages but it is widely accepted that the Proto-Indo-Europeans were nomadic pastoralists who migrated long after the first Neolithic migrations. Also, their religious concepts were similar to that of Turks and other Turanians.

  18. AS says:

    “did the Indo-European languages originate from Turanians?”

    If you believe in the Kurgan Hypothesis, then yes. If you believe in the Anatolian Hypothesis, then it is a lot less clear-cut, as so many different groups were moving in and out of there that it is impossible to say with confidence what was going on linguistically.

    Check back soon for Part 4, which might be relevant to this topic, since the Aryan-Turanian dichotomy comes from Iran. At any rate, it would be a good idea when explaining this topic to others make the vocabulary distinction between “Turkic” (descriptor of language) and “Turanian” (descriptor of lifestyle).

  19. Great work, AS. The Aryan Diffusion series is shaping up to be a solid work of revisionism (is that the appropriate word?)

    In Eastern Europe, Slavic ethno-nationalists refer to “Slavic Vedas,” an Pagan Slavic philosophy, which seems to bear some elements of Aryanism, though, unless some real digging is done, it will be just another thing to be grouped under the umbrella of White Nationalism.

    However, the word “Vedas” is very similar to the current word for “knowledge” in Polish where it’s “wiedza.” In certain declensions, the word for “faith” which is “wiara” is also very similar.

    Also, will you be covering Korea at all in the Aryan Diffusion series? I know a bit about that country and its farming culture is very developed and quite old. To this day, you can get what I have been calling “Aryan meals” since they are effectively vegan and made directly from farm production. These are mainly seen as traditional dishes, with the ethical nature of their production being incidental. And meat eating and alcohol use is also very popular in Korea.

    However, some people there could see Aryanism as Korea has had little direct contact with Judaism, only in recent times given its long history.

  20. AS says:

    Korea was mentioned in Part 2:

    http://aryanism.net/culture/aryan-race/aryan-diffusion-part-2/

    Jeulmun and Mumun are from Korean archaeological sites, and Hwanung is from Korean mythology – we are guessing that he was one of Yandi’s generals. For further discussion on this topic, please use the Part 2 comments section:

    http://aryanism.net/blog/aryan-sanctuary/a-different-way-to-refer-to-geography/

    Can you describe those meals in more detail, Miecz?

    We had some South Korean commenters a while back, but they didn’t like our suggestion that US troops should get out of South Korea, so they left. Do you (or anyone else here) have any advice on how to persuade South Koreans to oppose US military presence on Korean soil?

  21. Nationalism is very popular in South Korea. There are disputes about historical issues with Japan and North Korea, as well as territorial disputes. Nationalist South Koreans see the US as a guarantor of national security. To a degree it is, but it also keeps Korea under its yoke. Korea’s major decisions are made for it, and this is what Koreans don’t really see, especially in the South.

    Opposing US presence on the Korean peninsula would have to stress that US presence there actually is more dangerous as it helps to keep tension alive. The US routinely does military drills right up against NK’s waters and it is this that leads to so called “provocations” from the North, such as shelling of Yeonpyeong Island. If the US were taken out of the equation, none of this would happen and seriously motivated discussions to unite Korea would take place between NK and SK.

    About vegan meals, they are mainly found in rural and mountainous areas, especially near Buddhist temples. Korean Buddhist monks are vegan based on the Buddhist non-violence principle, which is pretty close to Aryanism I would say. However, they are also pacifists – not Aryan. The food in Buddhist temples, which you can try during a temple stay trip, is mainly rice in various forms, vegetables (lots of root vegetables) and tea. In mountain towns, there is a bit more variety to food, but due to no land for livestock, only crops are grown. I have not seen evidence that this rather optimal use of land is genuinely motivated by ethics, at least not today, but some may very well be.

    Some examples of Korean vegan meals:
    Soybean stew – vegetables in a soy-based broth. Served with rice on the side.
    Konguksu – cold soup with bean-based broth with noodles and cucumbers.
    Bibimbap (“mixed rice”) – can be served vegan though they often add bits of meat and/or an egg. In essence though, it’s rice mixed with vegetables which can be raw.
    Kimchi – has many varieties, but it’s vegetables (cabbage, radish, scallions, cucumbers, pickles, onion) prepared a certain way with a spicy red pepper to be stored over winter. Koreans eat this virtually each day with every meal along with rice.
    Kimbab – looks like sushi rolls, but its with vegetables inside and also usually a piece of ham and egg. However, these could easily be done away with, though that would require some tweaking to Aryanize… as a great many things today.
    There are many tofu based dishes as well. Cuisine is also highly localized, depends where you go, you’ll get different things. Korea’s Gangwando province (north east) has the closest to Aryan food, I would say. It’s mountainous, so livestock herding and fishing are not part of its culture as other parts of the country.

    Korean food has so many vegetables that I feel it would be easier to Aryanize than most Western cuisines, but it will required a good amount of tweaking and willful breaking of traditionalism.

  22. AS says:

    “Nationalism is very popular in South Korea. There are disputes about historical issues with Japan and North Korea, as well as territorial disputes. Nationalist South Koreans see the US as a guarantor of national security. To a degree it is, but it also keeps Korea under its yoke. Korea’s major decisions are made for it, and this is what Koreans don’t really see, especially in the South.”

    Exactly, and this is why it is absurd for such South Koreans to call themselves “nationalists”. How can dependency be described as “nationalism”? But they don’t like it when we point this out. This is why it is vital for us to have a precise and articulate consciousness of what nationalism is and is not, so as to be able to call out all those who use the term incorrectly.

    Anyway, if it’s the “nationalist” South Koreans who support US military presence, then how do South Koreans who oppose US military presence describe themselves politically? And is there a party or movement that represents them?

    “Opposing US presence on the Korean peninsula would have to stress that US presence there actually is more dangerous as it helps to keep tension alive. The US routinely does military drills right up against NK’s waters and it is this that leads to so called “provocations” from the North, such as shelling of Yeonpyeong Island. If the US were taken out of the equation, none of this would happen and seriously motivated discussions to unite Korea would take place between NK and SK.”

    I agree completely. It’s the usual inversion of cause and effect: they create the tension and then cite the tension as the justification for their “response”. It’s just like the IDF “responding” to Palestinian “provocation” when Israel is pumping sewage into the Palestinian water supply, or Golden Dawn police “responding” to ethnic minority “provocation” after Golden Dawn thugs do organized stabbings and home vandalizations against ethnic minorities.

  23. Ossendowski says:

    “In Eastern Europe, Slavic ethno-nationalists refer to “Slavic Vedas,” an Pagan Slavic philosophy, which seems to bear some elements of Aryanism, though, unless some real digging is done, it will be just another thing to be grouped under the umbrella of White Nationalism.”

    The authenticity of the “Slavic Vedas” is dubious and the same goes for many other writings supposedly connected to the old Slavic faith. I have my doubts about Rodzimowierstwo being a good starting point for a new Aryan Slavic culture. Don’t get me wrong, I am all for reviving the Aryan practices of the pre-Christian Slavs (for example, the Lechitic peoples used to cremate their dead), but apart from that, Gnostic Christianity seems like a much better basis. Have you heard about the Bogumils, a Slavic Gnostic sect mainly active in Bulgaria and Macedonia between the 10th and 15th century? They are probably worth looking into.

  24. Ossendowski,
    I had my suspicions about Slavic Vedas, and was mainly considering if it is a starting point for an Aryanist movement due to it being devoid of Jews. Sadly, Judaized Gentiles are enough to ruin something. I have not heard of the Bogumils, but I will look into them.

  25. Victor says:

    Thanks, AS, I’m looking forward to part 4!

  26. Chris says:

    https://m.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=496218993890

    I found this interesting but I think this might be indo Aryan foppery?

  27. AS says:

    I saw them on YouTube before, where women from present-day Germany were going there to get impregnated. It’s like the Jerry Springer parody of Aryanism:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrP0OS2xdqY

    Here is a more detailed article about the Brokpa, which describes a much more mixed culture:

    http://www.krepublishers.com/02-Journals/S-EM/EM-02-0-000-08-Web/EM-02-2-000-08-Abst-PDF/EM-02-2-077-08-099-Bhasin-V/EM-02-2-077-08-099-Bhasin-V-Tt.pdf

    I have no problem believing that the Brokpa have SOME Suryavansha ancestry considering that their village is in the Indus basin, but not necessarily more than people living in other areas of the Indus basin. The rest is probably sensationalism. Of course, if individual Brokpa want to join us, they are as welcome as anyone else to send in a contact form.

    Also, this obsession with blondness in your linked article is ridiculous, when serious researchers in National Socialist Germany had already figured out how to ISOLATE traits such as blondness in breeding. An isolable trait is useless as a tracer, as its isolability implies that it is inherited independently of other traits. To claim that, because “the Nazis” knew how to isolate blondness, therefore “the Nazis” believed that blondness qualifies one as Aryan, is complete drivel. I could post pictures of blond Jews 24/7 but some people still won’t get it.

    Here’s another of these idiots (and BNP member, not surprisingly):

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2488558/Racist-slaughtered-partner-daughter-spared-youngest-child-pure-Aryan.html

  28. mandrake says:

    It is nonsense that pure Aryans are blue eyed and blonde haired. This is Himmler’s Nordic ideal, nothing to do with authentic Aryanism what Adolf Hitler envisioned. Actions speak louder than words and louder than genetic traits.

    Pure Aryans are now no-more anyway, since the diffusion of the Aryan race, which is available on this very website. We must rekindle those who have Aryan blood-memory, regardless of their genetic lineage.

  29. John Johnson says:

    This is a very good example of contrasting faces.

    http://oi42.tinypic.com/2prtcia.jpg

    Interestingly enough, I found this image on a website that used pictures of Indians with blue and green eyes to show that they and Europeans were related. Well, he definitely didn’t get his looks from Aryan blood!

  30. AS says:

    Here is an actual Anglo-Indian multiethnic celebritiy:

    http://us.cdn282.fansshare.com/celebrity/katrinakaif/450_katrina-kaif-boom-897084905.jpg

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-M5SrgdDIZ10/UKUu-03N5jI/AAAAAAAAAtQ/BTXL2ViMDnA/s1600/katrina_kaif_007_es.jpg

    Notice that Kaif is significantly more robust than typical monoethnic (Turanian-leaning) Indian celebrities:

    http://visitonlineworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/deepika_padukone_20120125_1572870386.jpg

    http://img.wallbeam.com/14processed/cute%20sonam%20Kapoor%20hd%20wallpaper.jpg

    Cro-Magnon blood increases robustness but does not necessarily produce more Aryan-leaning appearance (compare Kaif to Dhupia above), contrary to Eurocentrist assumptions. This is of course not to say that Anglo-Indians cannot look Aryan; in fact, here is an example of a heavily Aryan-leaning Anglo-Indian:

    http://www.bubblegumdancer.com/images/80/gallery/wallpaper1.jpg

    Notice moreover that Kumble, unlike Kaif, displays no increased robustness. This shows the difference between Cro-Magnon and New Trojan (explanation coming in Part 6) blood. What do you think?

  31. John Johnson says:

    Yes, it’s quite an amazing contrast. I’ve noticed that when mixed or average-looking people who are from ethnicities which have historically been isolated have children, the children often end up either very Aryan-looking or very-non-Aryan looking. It’s interesting how genes recombine.

  32. LuciferOverZion says:

    I was watching some Bollywood movies and it’s unbelievable how Turanid/Gentile/Robust-looking some leading actresses are.
    For example:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b7/Kareena_Kapoor_in_2015.jpg

  33. I’ve been re-reading the Aryan Diffusion series and find it quite inspiring and profound. I was wondering what light could be shed upon Tilak’s books about Artic Home in the Vedas could actually rather than being a proof of the Aryan home, could actually be evidence of the Vedic people being connected to the more northern Turanian people? Have you read Tilak’s books about Orion and Artic Home?

  34. AS says:

    @Isaac

    I haven’t read “The Arctic Home in the Vedas”, but I agree that the Vedics came from the north, as proposed explicitly in Part 3, and further reinforced in the Roundup:

    http://aryanism.net/wp-content/uploads/brick.jpg

    At the time of publication of his book (1903), Indus Valley civilization had not yet been archaeologically discovered, therefore Tilak made the understandable error that India went directly from Vanavasi to Vedic. Since the Vanavasi could not have been the Aryans, he concluded by elimination that the Vedics were the Aryans. Fortunately, Indus Valley civilization was found soon after. Now we know exactly why Siddhartha called his ANTI-Vedic revolution Arya Dharma.

    Academically (not morally, of course) I support Turanism, because I am happy for Turanists to claim the Vedics and thus at least help to clear up the picture:

    http://aryanism.net/wp-content/uploads/beef.jpg

  35. @AS – I didn’t really think about it being published so early compared to the Indus Valley discovery, so that makes a lot of sense. I notice that Rosenberg as well as Savitri Devi (probably others too) who confuse the Vedics, thinking they are Aryan (the whole Aryan Invasion Theory). I wish at times that their works could be revised or maybe revisited and published with commentary, as they have many wonderful things, but some of their historical details are incorrect based on subsequent discoveries.

    I did read your Aryan Diffusion series in its entirety and really find it quite inspiring and insightful. It is quite powerful to get a grasp of the big picture globally of what has happened in human history. I always think of Hitler when he said that world history needs to be explored from a true racial perspective, and certainly what you’ve done with the Diffusion series is a big part of the way in that direction. It would be awesome to eventually make this into a book, with even more pictures and the like?

    It is interesting to hear about Turanism: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turanism
    It would be interesting if they worked out that the Jews are also a part of their “nation”?

  36. RP says:

    @AS
    “I have been unable to find suitable skull comparison photos for this page.”

    Here is a picture of a Neolithic Skull from the Harappan civilization:

    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Human_Skull_-_2600-1700_BCE_-_Harappa_-_Indian_Museum_-_Kolkata_2014-04-04_4475.JPG

  37. AS says:

    @RP

    Thanks! I already have a picture of this skull from another angle. But if you can find a picture of a Vanavasi type skull (which I have so far had no luck in), I will be able to pair them up for contrast and update Part 3 accordingly.

    Since I have been posting a lot of maps lately, here is another one I found:

    http://i.huffpost.com/gen/4420258/original.jpg

  38. RP says:

    @AS
    “Since I have been posting a lot of maps lately, here is another one I found:

    http://i.huffpost.com/gen/4420258/original.jpg”

    Many Brahmins have adopted the vegetarian diet, on the guidance of later era astika philosophers from the “Samkhya” school of thought, who advocate abiding by a “Sattva” (serene, compassionate) lifestyle:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samkhya
    (Samkhya is believed to have non Vedic origins)

    Unfortunately, the secular humanist left in India is not appreciative of this, and associates vegetarianism with “caste based fascism”. There is some truth to this, as Brahmanic vegetarianism is somewhat rooted in religious Orthodoxy and purity, but what is the solution to this? Is it because casteism is simply intrinsic to Hinduism, as they suggest? Do Hinduism, and Hindus, have no positive traits and should simply be disregarded as individuals? That is what the secular humanists seem to insinuate.

    Jews have also created religious sectarianism by creating tension between Hindus and Muslims. One way they do this is by criticizing Hinduism, while staying purposefully silent on Islam, giving the average observer the impression that they are on the side of Muslims. Jewish controlled opposition agents can then promote islamophobia by pointing out this obvious contradiction and appear “rational” by comparison.

  39. AS says:

    @RP

    “Brahmanic vegetarianism is somewhat rooted in religious Orthodoxy and purity, but what is the solution to this?”

    I suggest that non-brahmin Hindus start a movement to concertedly demonstrate that they are capable of becoming vegetarian (or, better yet, vegan) at a statistically higher rate than brahmins, thereby proactively ending the stereotypical association of vegetarianism with the brahmin caste. If they fail in this, it is entirely their own fault, which cannot be blamed on anyone else.

    In fact, the real question should be: why did the secular humanists – if they were sincere anti-casteists – not recommend this positive approach, preferring the negative approach of discouraging vegetarianism altogether?

  40. RP says:

    @AS
    “In fact, the real question should be: why did the secular humanists – if they were sincere anti-casteists – not recommend this positive approach”

    Because the secular-humanists are casteists themselves, and many of them belong to upper caste families. Secular humanism allows them to retain their position in the social hierarchy, just as pro-empire sentiment did during the colonial era when the British promoted casteism.

  41. RP says:

    @AS

    “But if you can find a picture of a Vanavasi type skull”

    I’ve had no luck finding one either, but if you search for “Adivasi” (an umbrella term for all tribal populations in present-day India) in Google Images, you’ll find some pretty Gentile-looking phenotypes.

    Funny thing is, their facial structure is remarkably similar to that of many present-day “Whites”! I suppose it makes “White” supremacist Gentiles bristle knowing that they have some genetic commonality with their “non-White” Gentile counterparts …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>