A different way to refer to geography

Before going onto the next installment of Aryan Diffusion, I first want to suggest that Aryanists ditch the conventional continental system of physical geography. Islands can continue to be called by their existing names, but when Aryanists refer to a certain region of non-island land, we should do so according to the nearest major river, as should be the Aryan way of looking at physical geography. This riparian system is perfectly practical and more accurate than the continental system, and more importantly it automatically de-emphasizes the divisive (and stereotype-loaded) boundaries implicit to the continental system. Ultimately it is one aspect in the assertion of our worldview as a reasonable alternative to the existing Western worldview that is taught in schools worldwide. All rivers join in the ocean. All rivers were carved by rainfall. All rivers were created by sunlight. Villages and towns did not grow out of “continents”, but out of river valleys. “Continents” are arbitrary and meaningless abstractions. Rivers are real and fundamental to culture.

The term “Asia” was originally used to refer to what we now call “Asia Minor” (ie. Anatolia-Armenia). It was never meant to be used as a term to refer additionally to everything from Palestine to Korea. Those who formally made this ludicrous extension were just intellectually lazy, and have only created the need in practice for such cumbersome subdivisions as “West Asia”, “Central Asia”, “South Asia”, Southeast Asia” and “East Asia”. How much more elegant would it have been to refer to the regions by their major rivers instead?

So, last time we saw that the Yayoi most likely originated from the Yangtze delta. This time, let’s go to the Yangtze Valley and see where those people came from and what they were up to:

http://aryanism.net/culture/aryan-race/aryan-diffusion-part-2/

Again, these pages are not just of prehistorical and ancient historical hobbyist interest. We are interested in recruiting people alive today, especially young people, who have the blood memory and the idealism to better the world against all odds. If there are any Sinosphere Mohists reading this, please contact us:

http://aryanism.net/about/contact/

Trust me, if we could get Mohism back up and running, it could be a game-changer the likes of which few have imagined. Chinese history would have been entirely different had Mohism stayed around long enough to see the arrival of Buddhism; the two would have effortlessly blended into an incredible ideology that would have lit up the world. It didn’t happen, but it could start happening now provided there are people willing to work together to kick it off. Well, anyone out there want to give it a shot?

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17 Responses to A different way to refer to geography

  1. Anthony says:

    A good alternative indeed. The current geographical system is so flawed. Why, for example, is Europe considered a separate continent. India is equally isolated, but it is only considered to be a subcontinent. Either India and Europe should both be considered separate continents, or they should be considered subcontinents of Asia. But once we consider Europe and Asia to be one continent, it becomes clear that the continental system is not very useful, since this is such a huge area. ‘Australia’ is also quite an irritating name. Originally, the Europeans were going to call the hypothesised southern continent ‘Australia’ (Southern Land), but after sailing around what we currently call Australia and realising it does not extend to the south pole, they gave up and called it Australia, not knowing that they were right all along and there really is a southern continent! When they finally did discover the southern continent, they had to settle with the name ‘Antarctica’.

    Regarding the Riparian system, Mandrake will tell you that this already exists to some extent in our area. Many of the areas around us are named after rivers, sometimes being the official names instead of a usual county name ending in ‘-shire’.

  2. Phoenix says:

    Wonderful. This post couldn’t have struck a better chord with me today. Recently, I rode over the Columbia – massive beautiful river that cuts deep into the land… I was struck by how much we rely on it, and how little I had realised before I just took a few hours to look and understand what I saw. The sun brilliantly glittering off the waters, so flat and wide, churning power for us all. Giving us water, warmth, food, electricity, and out of this homes. The beauty of the area is food for the soul; I try to imagine the land before it was industrialized.
    I believe moving water to be an essential component of Aryan life. Rivers age, and many generations of people have they “seen” born and die. They mean knowledge of the past, they mean a path to carve out one’s destiny. A river’s waters run, renewed by our Sun and Earth by way of our seas. The sea is vast, and our journey to it will not be easy. The bend of a river is elegant, graceful, noble. It’s raw strength can undo man’s struggle against it, but it symbolizes the Will within us.
    Even more than this is the fact the river can supply power, and fertile soil to grow cereals, herbs, fruits and vegetables. It would be a practical and extremely beneficial place to settle.

    Also, there are plenty of rivers and mountain streams up North ;) If any of you have never been to the PNW… GO.

  3. AS says:

    @Anthony

    “Why, for example, is Europe considered a separate continent.”

    The continental system is Hellenic in origin, and therefore Hellenocentric. Everything west of Greece was Europe, everything east of Greece was Asia, and everything south of Greece was Africa. It is in conception no different that the Sinocentric system used in ancient China:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siyi_(Four_Barbarians)

    Therefore, from an unbiased perspective, to call China “Asian” makes about as much sense as to call Greece “Xirong”! Each location is so distant from the original scope intended by the ancient term that it should be considered a joke. But people the world over have become so used to the Hellenic continental system that this does not occur to them.

    “‘Australia’ is also quite an irritating name.”

    We could try calling Australians “Murray-Darling Valley people”? Or perhaps not. At least Australia can get away with being an island, albeit a huge one. In any case, Australia is the name of the country, so there’s no problem. The continental concept that includes Australia is Oceania, which for some reason does not get used much in the media anywhere.

    @Phoenix

    Did you take photos?

    “If any of you have never been to the PNW… GO.”

    Speaking of the PNW, racists have a fairly well-known plan (the Butler Plan, named after Richard Girnt Butler (Gentile)) to turn it into a Gentile ethnostate. We must prevent this from happening on the grassroots level. As I have repeated over and over again, if we let the situation deteriorate in the coming years/decades until the Feds fight the far-right, it will make the far-right look like the good guys (which of course they are not), which would be a propaganda disaster for us. Therefore it must be conscientious citizen volunteers who fight the far-right (and then, having established a heroic image with such a record, these same citizen volunteers can then politically rival the Feds for authority). For now we need every online counterpropagandist available – please contact us if you are available and willing to help – to embarass all attempts at racist propaganda pertaining to the PNW every time it turns up, as soon as it turns up. The hearts and minds of the PNW must not be poisoned by racism. Here is a recent propaganda battleground (check the comments section, help out if you have time):

    http://www.dakotastudent.com/739/opinion/equality-still-a-problem-in-america-2/

    In a worst-case scenario we may need the organization that SolAryan is involved in (you guys know which one) to physically defend the innocent from attack by the far-right. Of course I hope that it doesn’t come to this and that we can win with propaganda alone. But it is better to prepare for combat and then not have to resort to it than to not prepare and then find that we need it after all.

    The Butler Plan also includes plans to expand into Canada. This is something that Stephanie and others should keep an eye on, just in case.

  4. Mandrake says:

    Forgive my absence of late but it has been rather hectic with my life of late so I haven’t been active on here or my blog. As Anthony correctly states, we in this region of England do have manifold place names.

  5. Very interesting article. Mainstream geopolitics touches on this topic, but only slightly and they always ignore the geographical golem known as Israel. The problem is that until materialism is done away with, there will always be a two-fold purpose of rivers on maps. One, the ancient cradle of a folk purpose, as you the article says “Villages and towns did not grow out of “continents”, but out of river valleys.”

    However, rivers are also used as boundaries as they cannot be argued about, they are just there. Soviet domination of East Germany and Poland was only part of what got Germans and Poles finally stop arguing over land, the other part was the Oder-Neisse line, a boundary placed along rivers.

    To get a glimpse of modern geopolitics, take a look at the American company called StratFor, it is founded and owned by Jews. Virtually all of their discussion is limited to economic worth, military power and boundaries and buffer zones. However, they cleverly talk about geography beyond conventional boundaries from time to time, though notice that it always goes back to how it serves money.

  6. AS says:

    Good to see you around again, Miecz! (To other Aryanists who have a blog, if you want more traffic, do what Miecz does and include your blog URL underneath your name and email address when you comment, so that people can click on your name and go to your blog.)

    “rivers are also used as boundaries as they cannot be argued about, they are just there.”

    This is ironic, as the original way was for the river to form the centre of a country, and for the limits of the river basin to form the boundaries of the country. It makes much more sense for deserts to be used as boundaries than rivers. In my vision of a world with a reducing population under state control of reproduction, it would be most efficient for non-river-basin lands (especially deserts) to be evacuated first, and for lands directly on the river valleys to be evacuated last. We would literally be turning the settlement sequence backwards in time.

    By the way, just a reminder to everyone: discussing rivers is fine, but this post is also the place to discuss the Aryan Diffusion Part 2 page itself! I find it funny that everyone seems to be ignoring the page that the post was supposed to be promoting, and concentrating on the post instead. To pick up from a point that JJ brought up in the Part 1 discussion:

    “It seems that they traveled up the Songhua-Amur River system, although so far I haven’t done any research on the people living further downstream.”

    He was correct, of course. I’d assume they were part of the Hwanung expedition that moved further north. Heilongjiang is remarkably arable:

    http://www.china-profile.com/data/maps/map_first-grade-arable-land_1.gif

    And, consistently, Manchurians look different than Mongolians even though both live in the north. It is easy to find both Turanian-leaning and Aryan-leaning phenotypes among Manchurians:

    http://www.brns.com/picts2g/rosamund2.jpg

    http://img.blog.163.com/photo/qEucvthkZvhY2xy7DZ8exw==/844987880085738566.jpg

    Same people, another angle:

    http://www.wallpaper1080hd.com/Picture/allimg/c100330/12E91A595G10-3EF8.jpg

    http://www.zhfczz.com/uploadfile/2011/0903/20110903020817727.jpeg

  7. John Johnson says:

    On the topic of river basins, I’ve always thought the Mississippi River in the USA is a great example. It cuts across nearly the entire north-south length of the country and is located in the center. Its tributaries span from the Rocky Mountains in the west to the Appalachian mountains in the east, and its basin comprises of nearly all American agricultural land.

    -

    On the subject of China, I don’t have any Neolithic-looking people to add, but since we’ve been stressing how Aryans across the world look similar to each other, I would like to show the same is true for those of Paleolithic descent!

    http://i44.tinypic.com/2122yu.jpg
    http://i40.tinypic.com/qqu741.jpg

  8. Phoenix says:

    That’s really interesting John, thanks for sharing those images, they all look related, even when accounting for all the numerous photoshop corrections. I’m actually on the hunt for neolithic skulls. What are your tactics so that I might assist? So far I keep running across your pre-dynastic egyptian skull, but I’m still looking everyday.

    The Columbia river I believe is also a good example, although misused some for fishing and the growing of hay and alfalfa it does provide fertile land for many of the orchards in Washington. Lots of pears and apples and vineyards (although I don’t condone drinking), potatoes, beets and beans and wheat. If and when this region is aryanized I picture the replacement of fodder with wheat and corn and maybe upland rice.

  9. AS says:

    “On the topic of river basins, I’ve always thought the Mississippi River in the USA is a great example.”

    Yes, it covers much of the Eastern Agricultural Complex that Decebal has been researching.

    “On the subject of China, I don’t have any Neolithic-looking people to add”

    Kelly Chen’s face is virtually the definition of Turanian-leaning:

    http://www.wallpaperme.com/70265-3/kelly-chen-166.jpg

    http://sin.stb.s-msn.com/i/6C/D7D4E28EDA2B1D1E052BB509B5A.jpg

    She should definitely be a major case study in your upcoming comparative blog, JJ. Here is one more picture to emphasize what I mean:

    http://www.eastbabe.com/upfs/200604/20060405000116467.jpg

    As for Aryan-leaning (what we call the Yue type):

    http://pic3.bbzhi.com/mingxingbizhi/lilongyitiffanylee/star_starhk_241712_2.jpg

    http://big5.sznews.com/ent/images/attachement/jpg/site3/20120410/0019b90e167810edc6af2e.jpg

    http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m5rvpb5D3q1ruaagfo5_1280.jpg

    http://img.haxiu.com/allimg/111205/54_111205150907_1.jpg

    But I also want to bring up what JJ and I were discussing in private about how Jew-owned Western entertainment industries promote ethnic stereotyping. Compare the faces above to the faces of Chinese-descent Western celebrities:

    http://www3.pictures.zimbio.com/bg/Gwendoline+Yeo+Desperate+Housewives+DVD+launch+qC4GK1dciKQl.jpg

    http://cdn02.cdn.justjared.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/liu-leger/lucy-liu-herve-leger-07.jpg

    http://www4.pictures.gi.zimbio.com/Nan+Zhang+CW+Network+Gossip+Girl+Launch+Party+4nh047u_LD3x.jpg

    http://superiorpics.com/movie_pictures/mp/2005_Harry_Potter_and_the_Goblet_of_Fire/2005_harry_potter_and_the_goblet_of_fire_027.jpg

    If Hollywood etc. were really trying to de-emphasize ethnicity (as the idiotic far-right propaganda claims it is trying to), the easiest thing it could have done was use Aryan-looking actors of all ethnicities in movies and TV shows. In fact, it has been deliberately selecting EXTREME non-Aryan-looking actors to represent ethnic minorities on screen. In other words, Hollywood has been saying one thing (ethnicity doesn’t matter) but showing people’s eyes the opposite (ethnic minorities look primitive), thus setting up the exact Eurocentric backlash that we are seeing unfold now.

  10. John Johnson says:

    @Phoenix

    I do a general search on the topic, which leads to encyclopedia websites, and from there find major regional cultures or archeological sites. You can use these as keywords on anthropology forums or to search through old old books (from places like http://www.archive.org ) and modern journals.

    Wikipedia is a good place to start because on one page you can find dozens of linked words, and on those pages there will be an additional dozen. Eventually, one of those keywords should turn up a research paper or archeology/anthropology website which yields something useful. If you don’t find what you are looking for there, they should at least be able to point you in a better direction than a blind google search.

    @AS, thanks for sharing those pictures of the Yue type people. People on anthropology forums and even some white supremacists always obsess over neolithic-looking Japanese people (you know, claiming they are the only people on par with ‘whites’). I’ve never seen them post Chinese people (or people of any other ethnicity) who look like that!

  11. AS says:

    “People on anthropology forums and even some white supremacists always obsess over neolithic-looking Japanese people”

    I more often see them obsess over Jomon types which happen to approximate to Western standards of beauty. White supremacists consider Jomon superior to Yayoi (because Jomon are “Caucasoid” (whatever that’s supposed to mean)), which is the opposite of our view. Their rationale for considering Japanese superior to Chinese is because Japanese have Jomon blood which Chinese lack. If hypothetically we were to argue (and I am not suggesting we do) that Japanese are superior to Chinese, we would do so using the opposite rationale: that the Yayoi were the best of the Yue, to the extent that DESPITE mixing with Jomon the Yamato still ended up better than the lower-quality Yue they left behind.

    White supremacists also tend to consider northern Chinese (ie. more Huaxia blood) superior to southern Chinese (ie. more Yue blood), again the opposite of our view.

    Here are the kinds of Japanese celebrities I see them post a lot:

    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4127/5053148665_8571aea3a6.jpg

    http://yukienakamaworld.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/11122002-panasonic-nakama10.jpg

    as distinct from Yayoi types (quite similar to Yue type):

    http://i0.topit.me/0/cb/3e/1146827840ec03ecb0l.jpg

    http://img1.ak.crunchyroll.com/i/spire4/f38904b53c1e684b14df71e8f50220221230705476_full.jpg

    For comparison here is a French-Japanese celebrity:

    http://img.cosmo.trends.com.cn/upload/081107/0811071121438210.jpg

    whom I would put in the first set rather than the second set. Do you see what I mean? On the other hand, if you see them post genuine Yayoi types, feel free to repost them for us to see (in the Part 1 topic, of course).

    Here is a Shinshi type (Aryan-leaning Korean):

    http://star.koreandrama.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Lee-Se-Young-02.jpg

    I guess strictly speaking (yes, I am making this up as I go along) Aryan-leaning Manchurians should also be called Shinshi type. Here’s a clearer photo of Chow from previously:

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xx1SvamJgA8/T3mw5TrH6oI/AAAAAAAAAk0/dzJ-PnXbYT4/s1600/KathyChow2.jpg

  12. Hashtali says:

    @AS

    “Xiang Yu of Chu, a warrior-aristocrat and rare sun-worshipper”

    Where did you find material on Xiang Yu being a sun-worshipper? I’ve been trying to study him more in my spare time, but English-language material (including translations) are not very extensive.
    Also, the idea of the King of Ghosts is astounding:
    “Nevertheless, folklore persists that Xiang Yu has become the King of Ghosts, and that all who die with noble fury in our hearts will join his ghost army in the spirit world, where we will continue to wander invisibly until the day we find a way back into the world of the living, exact revenge on our enemies and reclaim our rule over the land.”
    Are there more references to Xiang Yu becoming the King of Ghosts than only the poem by Li Qingzhao?

  13. AS says:

    @Hashtali

    “Where did you find material on Xiang Yu being a sun-worshipper?”

    Religion: Sun-worship (Chu folk beliefs)

    http://zhidao.baidu.com/link?url=UMqtld7wHRNDUArNIYd8CPFgCxs9HSmr9jsIi5u1uiXCqGf6H7ED3GPZdYqbBhru9EANnPmtv3cycx44GQTNZtwfKAguc11ea4k8HAMo_nC

    “Are there more references to Xiang Yu becoming the King of Ghosts than only the poem by Li Qingzhao?”

    The poem itself is based on a (nominally) Buddhist anecdote of a Tang Dynasty monk meeting the ghosts of Xiang Yu and his army while meditating. According to the monk, the ghosts were unaware that the Chu-Han War had finished centuries ago, instead believing that it was still ongoing. This is used as an example of the folly of subjectivity. The thing is, in a spiritual sense, the ghosts are actually correct (and will remain correct so long as anti-Confucianist sentiments exist – yes, that ghost army was us!), and the way this story should be interpreted is how mainstream Buddhism in China had by then degenerated into a Confucianist mouthpiece with no understanding of the spirit world.

    Besides, even in White Vengeance which you told me you saw, the last scene shows Xiang Yu’s spirit world reunion with Yu Miaoyi in palatial scenery (rather than rural scenery as would be appropriate for purely private romantics) with his army initially standing in the background (until it vanishes the instant they embrace, confirming that his aim had never been power).

  14. Hashtali says:

    @AS

    “Religion: Sun-worship (Chu folk beliefs)”

    Thanks! It’s interesting how they emphasize the sun-worship part for Xiang Yu given that “Chu folk beliefs” were not thoroughly Aryan:
    “Later Chu culture was known for its affinity for shamans. The Chu culture and government strongly supported Taoism and native shamanism supplemented with some Confucian glosses on Zhou ritual.”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chu_(state)#Culture

    “The poem itself is based on a (nominally) Buddhist anecdote of a Tang Dynasty monk meeting the ghosts of Xiang Yu and his army while meditating. According to the monk, the ghosts were unaware that the Chu-Han War had finished centuries ago, instead believing that it was still ongoing. This is used as an example of the folly of subjectivity. The thing is, in a spiritual sense, the ghosts are actually correct (and will remain correct so long as anti-Confucianist sentiments exist – yes, that ghost army was us!), and the way this story should be interpreted is how mainstream Buddhism in China had by then degenerated into a Confucianist mouthpiece with no understanding of the spirit world.”

    Does the anecdote mention the monk’s response to Xiang Yu’s army?

    “Besides, even in White Vengeance which you told me you saw, the last scene shows Xiang Yu’s spirit world reunion with Yu Miaoyi in palatial scenery (rather than rural scenery as would be appropriate for purely private romantics) with his army initially standing in the background (until it vanishes the instant they embrace, confirming that his aim had never been power).”

    That was a good response to the Song of Gaixia, though the movie had a strong ending for the two without it.

  15. AS says:

    “It’s interesting how they emphasize the sun-worship part for Xiang Yu given that “Chu folk beliefs” were not thoroughly Aryan”

    You are correct. Our siding with Chu in the Chu-Han War is in not because we endorse Chu culture as a whole, but only because a Chu victory would have allowed ideologies other than Confucianism a better chance to regroup and possibly triumph at a later stage.

    Looking back now, perhaps it would even have been wiser to have let the Qin Dynasty (which was at least also anti-Confucianist) continue long enough to finish off Confucianism before overthrowing it…..

    “Does the anecdote mention the monk’s response to Xiang Yu’s army?”

    The monk attempted to convince the ghosts that the war had ended, but the ghosts were adamant in their belief that it had not.

  16. Hashtali says:

    “You are correct. Our siding with Chu in the Chu-Han War is in not because we endorse Chu culture as a whole, but only because a Chu victory would have allowed ideologies other than Confucianism a better chance to regroup and possibly triumph at a later stage.”

    It’s possible that they could have triumphed under the initiative of Xiang Yu (I’ll elaborate a bit below).

    “Looking back now, perhaps it would even have been wiser to have let the Qin Dynasty (which was at least also anti-Confucianist) continue long enough to finish off Confucianism before overthrowing it…..”

    That’s one way to go about it, but I don’t think Xiang Yu’s rebellion was less wise, primarily because his downfall was not inevitable. His major mistake was tearing down the centralized Qin state and replacing it with a feudal arrangement:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eighteen_Kingdoms
    This easily set the stage for a new struggle for hegemony. Had he set up a Chu Dynasty with him in the center as emperor and all others deriving power and authority from him, a rebellion would have been much more difficult. This is where Mohism, which advocates a centralized authority instead of feudalism, could have saved the day, both in terms of Xiang Yu’s ultimate success, and in finally defeating Confucianism thanks to being backed by state power. Unfortunately, Mohism had already declined in significance by Xiang Yu’s day; we probably won’t ever know if he or anybody close to him knew about it….

    “The monk attempted to convince the ghosts that the war had ended, but the ghosts were adamant in their belief that it had not.”

    I see. Indeed it still has not.

  17. RP says:

    @AS
    “As I have repeated over and over again, if we let the situation deteriorate in the coming years/decades until the Feds fight the far-right, it will make the far-right look like the good guys (which of course they are not)”

    FBI agents called Trump “Drumpf”; supporters “retarded”:
    https://www.businessinsider.com/fbi-agents-called-trump-drumpf-supporters-retarded-report-2018-6

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